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Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
students. we want to create a safe learning environment. what happened in newtown, first let me say my prayers and thoughts go to that entire community. we need to change our security protocol. we're all anxiously waiting for a report to come out in newtown, to tell us where the weaknesses are, but until that time, our community has made a collective decision to protect our 8,000 students, to put in our police officers in each of our nine schools. >> when we look at republican-led legislatures that want to arm teachers in an effort to prevent another tragedy, this is also in coordinate with what we saw in webster, new york, where four firefighters showing up basically to a trap, two were shot and killed, two others were injured, in webs sister, new york, but i want to play what one of your own colleagues, michael nutter had to say about a plan like yours taking place in their area. take a listen. >> i guess, you know, out of last week's bizarre press statement, it wasn't a press conference, i guess mr. lapierre would then say that firefighters need to have armed guards go with them. i
someone's labor. and that is very alienating. this kind of consumerism, which destroys the environment, which creates circumstances of the devolution of living standards -- this is the result of the global surplus recycling, which is why this squeezing of the delights of the workers to keep prices low, but to keep the price is lower than germany or japan, to keep the capital coming here, to keep the german and japanese finance going. i don't believe in pointing fingers at anyone. we are all part of this system that we have created over the last few decades. which met its nemesis because of its hubris. >> i would like to ask three questions. one is to summarise, briefly, what did happen in greece? why did we slide further down in the world? number two, could you please summarize an alternative approach? what could, for example, the greek prime minister have done instead of what they did it? and third, there is an economic system from 1789 that created a great america before america became a global power -- of that help greece? >> i will answer your questions starting at the beginning. w
. but it was also the case that in some environments that i wonder if in the disabled community, which was such an important stewardship, are their attempts to find ways to create technology and multi-sensory experiences for readers as they consume cultural artifacts certainly real book is a multi-sensory experience within itself. that is an old technology comparable to the print book. beyond that, i believe that there is not very much work being done in that area and i am very anxious that we should be able to provide braille to people in the disabled community to the music. the reason for that goes back, i think, to where it makes sense. obviously, it makes a lot of sense. but it is also a reading experience that is very different from audio reading and experiences that way. a lot of people have come to the conclusion that it is just as good for a blind person to listen to a book to read it in braille, and i totally disagree with that. it's a very difficult way of learning however, and i don't think it gives the generation of functionally illiterate kids by telling them just listen t
in an environment, at least i was fortunate enough, where we believed it was effective. you know it's very -- pretty much acceptable or maybe in vogue somewhat today to be so critical or almost invariably critical of the country and pointing out what is wrong. there are obviously things wrong. there are obviously things wrong when i grew up in georgia, and that was pointed out. but there was always an underlying belief that we were entitled to be a full participant in we the people. that is the way we grew up. it was the way the nuns who were all immigrants would explain it to us, that we were entitled as citizens of this country to be full participants. there was never any doubt that we were inherently equal and it said so in the declaration of independence. of course there were times later on bad i too became quite critical and would make glib remarks in deciding the not so pleasant and reciting the pledge of allegiance or sing things that i thought were -- [inaudible] people can youtube and it's around forever. i grew up in an environment where the people around me believed that this country coul
the environment of deregulation, rules were cut back and we have the opposite going on right now. consumers elect to go spend but consumers are reluctant and producers are going up and regulatory costs makes it hard to make a buck in this type of environment. >> arthel: all right. happy new year. thank you so much. >> secretary of state hillary clinton is returning to the state department next week after three weeks off from a stomach virus and concussion that kept her from testifying on the terror attack in libya but republican lawmakers still want answers. the question that secretary of state may be facing when she goes to the hill in just a moment. >> arthel: just released papers from former british prime minister margret thatcher involving ronald regulate and involving the queen of england. , because for every two pounds you lose through diet and exercise, alli can help you lose one more by blocking some of the fat you eat. let's fight fat with alli. ♪ >>. >> arthel: recently released documents showing margret thatcher in a rare visit made by ronald reagan back in 1982 including a case of b
together. it was very much a family environment. the third sister to come work for skinner was ellen littlefield. now, ellen outlasted both of her sisters at the mill, and she was working for skinner at the time of flood. she is the strongest female character in my book. after the flood. >> she also worked with skinner helping to salvage his silk, and she moved to holyoke and ultimately married his bookkeeper. now, after the flood the valley's loss was going to be or could be potentially someone else's gain. so after the disaster happened, the valley was a very popular spot for investors and capitalists. offers came from all over, from as far away as omaha, nebraska, to the manufacturers that had lost everything giving them incentives to move elsewhere and to relocate to other areas. one of the most vocal voices in this choir was that of holyoke, massachusetts. and holyoke was an ingeniously-designed city, specifically designed for industry. it was hoped to be even greater than the urban mill centers of lawrence. holyoke was considered to be the greatest potential mill power in new e
about parental environment, talk about a cultural decline. we are as the nra for responsible gun ownership. this was clearly not responsible. we need to have that conversation and be out in front on this. instead, they missed an opportunity blaming other people and really kind of drawing a line in the sand that didn't need to be drawn at this point. >> you're a gun owner. are you a member of the nra yourself? >> i am not. i support the nra but i'm not a member, no, sir. >> the relationship between an american and his or her gun is historic and something that creates great passion. what is your view about the specific campaign which i have been pursuing and the president is pursuing and others are pursuing which is not about banning guns, it's about banning assault weapons, getting the kind of weapons which can massacre school classrooms, these military style machines, getting those off the streets? >> right, when you have such a tragedy like we did, it was such a dark day for this nation. i think those types of conversations, talking about assault weapon bans and things like that
said, i grew up in an environment which was christian, which people followed their christian religion. others followed their muslim religion and others their african superstitions. and for me, this went to the heart of why the book became inevitable, or why i have been engaged in this discourse all my life. very strange. i find it very -- pretty close to 80, i should actually exist in an environment in which, for believing what i believe, or not believing what i do not believe, i'd be considered what i call terminal censorship. and go back to my history, and i don't mean me personally. the time when i lived and was raised. the history of my people. when the european explorers, of course, quickly followed by their religious storm troopers, the christian missionaries. they had a very serious problem and that was they couldn't find satan. they couldn't find the devil. if you want to convert people, you've got to first of all persuade them their soul is in dire danger. headed to the ultimate bonfire on the other side of existence. after that you need to label them followers of the devil
's claims service. it's hard to see opportunity in today's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management yeah we both relieve coughs, sneezing, aches, fevers. and i relieve nasal congestion. overachiever. [ female announcer ] tylenol® cold multi-symptom nighttime relieves nasal congestion. nyquil® cold and flu doesn't. >>> there exists in this country sadly a callous, corrupt, and corrupting shadow industry that sells and stows violence against its own people. through vicious, violent video games, with names like "bullet storm" "grand theft auto" "mortal combat" and "splatter house" and here's one. it's called "kindergarten killers." >> the nra blaming video games for creating a culture of violence in america. are video games really to blame, though? we'll get to that in a moment. first, republican strategist and gun owner hogan gidley. what was your reaction when you -- >> t
and the environment -- m 23 began on december 29 in uganda and are being mediated with uganda as the chair on the international conference of the great lakes region known as the i c g lra. as the two sides begin substantive con -- talks, the current cease-fire is holding and the parties continue to express commitment to a dialogue. much of the m-23's military success and prowess and would not have been possible without outside support. there's a credit to ballpark -- body of evidence that corroborates the assertions of the u.n. experts that the rwanda government provided significant military and political support to the end-23. while there is evidence of uganda providing support to and- 23, we do not have a body of evidence suggesting that the ugandan government as a policy supported the m-23. nonetheless, we sit and -- we continue to urge, ugandan officials that -- to make sure that supplies do not originate or travel through that territory. and we have not limited our response to diplomacy alone. as required by the fiscal year 2012 appropriations act, secretary clinton suspended foreign
that was happening in the area. a number of different things in environment that we had no idea. later, many kids in my neighborhood, i worked at the plant myself. got a sense of what it's like to be on the inside of the plant. there was one evening when i came home, from work at rocky flats, and turned on the television and it was a show on "nightline" that it was an exposÉ of what was really happening at the plant. and it was the first time that a really have an awareness, really have an understanding of what was happening at rocky flats and how extent -- extraordinary the contamination was but it was on that day i decided to quit my job at rocky flats come at the day i decided i would write a book about it. it took me about 10 years of research and writing to pull the story together. and i wanted to write a book that reads like a novel, but is very heavily footnoted come everything in the book is factual. so you can check back and see where the information comes from. but i wanted to write this story from the perspective of all of the different kinds of people whose lives have been affected b
has a negative effect on performance. >> as we do in a cultural environment in which age is stereotyped, right? >> yes. >> then you will conform willy-nilly to that stereotype, if you're supposed to be fragile at the age 80. >> yes. >> then you become fragile. >> exactly. >> if you think, however, that your's going to be living to the age 100, then you shatter the stereotype and you don't conform to it, and you're healthier? >> you are. >> you actuallyffect your health? >> you affect your health by your attitude. donald palmer has the oldest thing in the world that we are as a result of what we think. >> this is all the brain? >> of course. >> all a result of cognition. >> cognition, that's right. cognition is just a $10 word for thinking and all the aspects of thinking. >> can i use $10 words on this? >> yes. >> now, you know that nih, national institutes for health or of health. >> national institutes of metal. >> they -- of health. >> they just had within summary past couple of weeks they had a big meeting and they talked about how your mental state actually affects yo
to lay better eggs in this environment? >> no, but you'll be encouraged and inspired. >> reporter: fancy chickens do lay colored eggs, green and red. i tried one. it's really good. really good. i would definitely pay $100,000 for that egg. dan harris, abc news, new york. >> give it some gas, dan. >> the jet pack looks cool. the hen house, come on, now. every day. that looks like a good gift because that's something if you have that kind of money you can get into, you know what i mean? >> until you crash it. >> i don't have that kind of money. merry christmas, everybody. >>> this morning on "world news now," trouble times two. the west coast gets slammed again by powerful storms at the worst of times. >>> and with the tremendous snowfall and powerful wind swept rain, mother nature is not spending christmas and other parts of the country christmas cheer. it's monday, december 4. >> from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> and good monday morning, on this christmas eve. good to have brandy back in the house. it's been good. we had a little eggnog. >> we're making it a festive holiday. >
to experience work environments. long hours and everything else working life entails. wherever you go, there's always listens. it may not be where you want, but i'm sure there's going to be a lesson learned. every adolescent is the opportunity to prepare for work so they can start careers at an equal stance. [applause] >> i'm looking for a young man from one else. again, there's a case of mistaken identity. the one nearest to me. >> young people in my constituency said evenness goes as good when it got experience, but why can't you and skills in the classroom such as lifelong learning that the curriculum. work experience is always good, but you're not going to go to get the skills and this is good, but i think it would be better for one people in the long run. [applause] >> i'm sorry there is confusion in monaco. i would now like to call the woman who thought i was calling but i wasn't he running it now. every shia from, please. [inaudible] >> we need your experience and training for work in the modern world if this is essential for young people. for me, work experience is the best opportuni
economic environment, unfortunately. >> a wealth manager says need to austerity speculation before making big purchases. look at the money you have and the money you need and decide if you really need that next big purchase. harris? >> harris: the upside is to get your values in order, it sounds like. molly, good to see you, thank you. >> good to see you. some new signs the housing market might be bouncing back. home prices for the month of october are up in more than a dozen cities compared with last year. analysts say the higher prices are recovering even as it moves into the quieter sales period. home construction dropped a bit from october. it was still higher than it was last november. experts say builders are on track to start working on the most homes in four years, which could help create more construction jobs. well, from the supreme court battle over president obama's healthcare overhaul to the deadly meningitis and west nile outbreaks. 2012 was a very busy year in health news. dr. manny alvarez from the fox news medical a team has a recap. >> 2012 tense year at the intersection
and the hospital says it creates a warm welcoming environment for families in their birth suites. >>> five years ago tonight a tiger attack stunned people around the world. we return to the scene of the attack and look at the changes the zoo has made. >> the rain is tapering off for now but there's some more rain in the forecast. there's going to be a cold. some fog as well. all that >>> in news of the world tonight at least six people are dead and thousands homeless after fire struck two slums in manila. at least one of the fires may be the work of an arsonist. five of the dead were trapped inside their apartment when a fire broke out. riots broke out after the fire as residents fought with the firefighters saying their response was slow. >>> a new constitution passed with 64% of the vote. less than 1/3 of egypt's 52 million eligible voters cast ballots. opposition voters say the vote was -- opponents argue it ushers in islamic rule and restricts freedom. >>> the afghanistan, officials say the woman who killed an american advisor was islamic. it does not appear the woman has linked to militant
welcoming environment for families in their birth suites. >>> five years ago tonight a tiger attack stunned people around the world. we return to the scene of the attack and look at the changes the zoo has made. >> the rain is tapering off for now but there's some more rain in the forecast. there's going to be a cold. some fog as well. all in just over 12 minutes. >> we check the return policies of major storms. coming up next, what you need to know before you return an unwanted gift. well, well, well. growing up, we didn't have u-verse. we couldn't record four shows at the same time. in my day, you were lucky if you could record two shows. and if mom was recording her dumb show and dad was recording his dumb show then, by george, that's all we watched. and we liked it! today's kids got it so good. [ male announcer ] get u-verse tv with a total home dvr included free for life. only $29 a month for six months. rethink possible. >>> in news of the world tonight at least six people are dead and thousands homeless after fire struck two slums in manila. at least one of the fires may be the work
women do quite well in those types of environments. technology helps both allowing people to handle different aspects of their lives but it can be a great environment to have a fulfilling career. >> you have worked with a very interesting, strong man. what is that like? any tips? >> larry summers, mark zuckerberg, at the white house. it's very interesting all these big guys want you to run their staff. how you handle them? -- how do you handle them? >> the common thread in a lot of the relationships with strong man is a kind of openness. by having that openness, you develop a real, trusting relationship. this is both with women and men, but i think one of the unique features of mark zuckerberg, he basically live the mission of the company, give people the power to connect and share to make the world more open, and he lives by that. he sits in the middle of our campus and his conference room is a glass box. >> does he come in every day? >> every day. he rarely travels. you cannot get him out with anyone else, but he is just sitting there living the mission. >> what is he doing? >> if
-show host bill bennett. and a look ahead at the political environment in 23,
made the trains run on time. that was the environment that i grew up in and i felt very comfortable when bill i asked me to finish the book. again, silly me, i thought i can do this. whether it was hubris or not -- >> what do you think he saw i knew that he had not seen in any of the other possible writers? >> we did talk about that. he told me once -- he said, try to find someone. he said, this is like a mother giving away her children to be raised by another. i would say, bill. he would say, nice try, but no. he said "if i wanted anyone, and i do not, i would want a writer." later, when he last, he said "paul, you have written 500, 600 feature stories. that is where i started." he saw the journalists as having the same tools as the historian when it comes to sourcing. when all of that is assembled, tell a story that would pass the campfire test, i call it, a bunch of folks sitting around a campfire. and i guess he liked my stories. >> so, if you had to pick out of this book your favorite story, what would they be? >> i enjoyed his battles over the american second front and when to
in case they want to find a low security environment in which to go and steal weapons. new york has a problem with terrorist cells. so we also know which houses don't have guns. this is a severe danger to the community that this newspaper has brought about. >> gretchen: like i'm thinking, let's say now that somebody goes to rob one of these homes that they know they don't have guns, let's say something horrible happens, do those homeowners then have a lawsuit against the newspaper? >> you know, i don't necessarily think so. but i do think it would be smart for the homeowners and the gun owners to give notice to the newspaper that they fear for their security and their safety, that of their families and they would ask their -- the names and addresses be unpublished for purposes of safety. that's the minimum they can do at this point and ask for a written response from the newspaper. >> gretchen: very interesting. let's read the statement. this is from the journal news, the newspaper. the massacre in newtown, connecticut remains top of mind for many of our readers. our readers are und
, of the environment and i think of andy's work in that way, of his experience. we're both from pennsylvania so i always -- i feel a sense of that. but, you know, when i think of the work, again, it's a complete kind of externalization and of playing very god like situation. playing the creator of -- you can multiply, you can procreate image after image and at the same time you can have aspects of how we interpret images of perfection, defined images into abstraction of life and death. so they're so rich, the whole aspect of what it means to be alive and a sense of our parameters that might take place in drama in this work. >> rose: this is? >> well, this is disaster painting. warhol did a number of these orange disaster and it's an electric chair. in 1963 he was preparing for an exhibition in paris and he said "i'm going to call this show "death in america." but the image of death, the electric chair, is made kind of pretty in these electric chairs but i think there's so much conflict or complexity to the prettiness of warhol's banality. i think banality is really i sort of hinted at. i think th
with the environment, being off the grid, so there is no cell phone service here. and really, really appreciating your surroundings. the bay of fire in australia is in the most stunning, most unspoiled area of tazmania in the northwest coast. this is a place that really you have to be committed to going to, because part of the process of getting there is actually hiking for two days on these beautiful white sand dunes, and you hike -- it's not a lot of hiking, but you are definitely out there, and being a little bit adventurous. this is a place, again, that's off the grid. you're going to have no tvs, you're going to be pumping the water for your own showers. the reason you go there and the payoff, the incredible wildlife. you want to see wombats, wallabees, kangaroos, this is the place to go. hicks island is the brain child of an architect who was obsessed with how beautiful the surroundings were and wanted to celebrate that. so he built these incredible modern structures that are made of concrete, and the rooms only have three sides. that means one side is completely open to the elements. the brand-
the question of canada to be cut? is it politically possible in this environment to get enough republicans and democrats to support a deal that the white house wants on deficit reduction? because they been to the altar so many times on this same issue, taxes, medicare, social security, defense spending, you must wonder, if there's any agreement possible. host: first, commented today from the senate republican leader mitch mcconnell, who will join his colleagues later today at the white house. [video clip] >> i told the president last night we would be happy to look at whatever he proposes. the truth is we are coming up against a hard deadline. as i said, this is a conversation we should have had months ago. republicans are not about to write a blank check or anything senate democrats before or just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. that would not be fair to the american people. that said, we will see what the president has to propose. members on both sides will review it. then we will decide how best to proceed. hopefully, there's still time for an agreement of some kind
people under the age of 18 who work in any sort of environment cannot work for some types of heavy machinery. if we put this as our national campaign for this year, it's unrealistic to think we of the youth parliament can make such a great influence on government legislation which have such huge opposition from larger companies. it's not realistic we can make a change in one year so we should focus on something which we can change, which is bettering our criminal almost -- better rur curriculum. [applause] >> who wave we got from the west midlands? you at the end. thank you. >> i'd like you all to raise your hands if you have an -- -- she gets paid five pounds. an older sister who is two years older gets paid seven pounds. how is that fair? >> who have we got from london? the chap there with the white shirt. yes, indeed, you, sir. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i'm john from london. i'd like to echo the other young people who said the minimum wage does create unemployment. it also creates unemployment for both small companies who can't afford to carry on the cost to their customers. ho
the impact of -- >> on the environment -- >> the death of a princess. >> live from the johnson space center. >> you feel as though they love you? >> never forget the primary mission, we're newscast. >> history -- >> i was really mad that i was nine months pregnant. i was not at the berlin wall. i was like, hello, it's coming down, and i am here and can't travel. this is not acceptable. >> the terrible destruction left in the wake of hurricane andrew -- >> tragic ending to a fairytale that never quite was right. >> if i'm feeling this sense of loss, then the viewers are certainly going to be feeling the sense of loss. we owe it to them to tell the story as best we can. >> people around the country have begun to mourn the kennedy family's apparent latest tragedy today. >> we'll have a look at all the irony and joy as well as the tragedy in the life of john kennedy jr. >> we have breaking news to report for you this morning. it appears that 6-year-old elian gonzalez has been removed -- >> oklahoma city, so much heartache and still hope. >> the people versus o.j. simpson. >> an elected presiden
, called the raging bull thesis. the argument we were moving from a trading environment, which they had been talking about for ten years, and moving towards a new secular bull market beginning in 2013. that means you take out the old highs. we still believe that, 1615 who take out the old highs. housing getting better, turning after six years after a horrible recession. we're looking at the energy boom in the country. we're looking at the wireless mobility aspects to technology and we're looking at the -- one other phenomenon is the competitiveness. >> does that bring mom and pop home? >> what will bring mom and pop home ultimately is losing a little bit of money in their bond funds. over $1 trillion in bond funds over the last four years. but if you look at survey work, particularly survey of consumer finance by the federal reserve board, you'll see that people still want to buy equities. that's been true for the survey for the last, you know, 10, 12 years, despite what just happened. most people don't understand this, 35 to 39-year-olds is a cohort of the americans who begin to save f
environment, that energy would burst forth. host: jkl tweets in, raising the top tax rate will not make a dent in the annual deficit. money gravitates to tax write-offs and crafted loopholes. guest: that is what you are seeing happening in europe when they are raising tax rates. lower the rates, get rid of these massive deductions, and you would see a cleaner code, a less corrupt code. host: valerie in new jersey on our line for democrats. caller: good morning. the more i listen to mr. forbes speak, i am reminded why the reasons why i have lately not been a consistent viewer of c-span anymore. they twist the truth. there is no integrity in what is said anymore. if you look at the record of spending -- mr. forbes mentioned mr. obama's spending being higher than the bush years. that is not true. the deficit which increases our debt grew so much under obama because he put both wars into the budget. george bush kept them out of the budget, was not paying for them, so things looked good. in the first few years of the obama administration, he created more jobs than george bush did in eight years. ge
credit is going to be available? >> pretty tight. credit is still tight. regulatory environment is still difficult. banks have got poor loan quality on overall basis of the businesses are looking at. business development corpse. there is microlending opportunities and crowd funding opportunities which is new basically angel investors with the fec has reduced some of their limitations for businesses to get funding. >> juliet: this seems like no brainer ecommerce is the way it is. cyber monday shows that. >> it's growing but still frankly at low levels. probably online sales are only about 7% of total sales. they estimate mobile commerce could be about a trillion in revenues in 2016, 2017. so ecommerce is growing significantly. there is is a loft businesses that are still not online and don't have an online presence. >> that makes no sense to me. a lot of businesses that don't know that they can go and create a simple web site to get online so you can jump on your mobile guess. if you are out looking for a pizza shop you are most likely looking for it on your mobile device. if you are not
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)

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